Winter


While the USA has been in a deep freeze, it appears that we are south enough in the Raggeds (green dot) to miss the brunt of the cold fronts that have been reaching into the Bahamas.  We still have to move anchor every few days to get protection from the wind when it kicks up and/or changes direction.  


Screen Shot 2018-01-06 at 3.45.58 PM











The fronts have brought a few squalls, usually just enough to fill the tanks and then the sun comes back out.  













Rainy days are good for cooking.  New recipes are being tried and sourdough bread continues to be perfected!







In between squalls the fishing and snorkeling are inviting and I’ve even found another new blenny to identify.  It is kind of a stumper, so I’ll just have to go back and try to find it again.


 




Mark took my dinner order and brought home a handful of gray snappers for a wonderful sushi night.





Inevitably, one of those squalls will catch us on a beach walk, where we occasionally take cover in a cave or settle for getting soaked through, since the 80˚ temperatures make it feel pleasant.  




The beaches resemble harsh moonscapes.  Not only have they seen erosion since the hurricane, but some islands have breached and new bays or salt ponds are formed.  



P1090213











P1290675






We never tire of searching for beach treasures and shells.  Barbara even found a message in a bottle again this year.












It is heartening to see wildlife thriving, as in this conch nursery.  










The cold temperatures up north drives several sea birds down here for winter.  A few great blue herons and oystercatchers are in the area.







Along with the white-cheeked pintail ducks (aka: Bahama ducks), several blue-winged teals have shown up.  They are also a dabbling duck with a distinctive white crescent behind the bill (not a full cheek like the white-cheeked) and white patches on the rear.  









On Buena Vista Cay, we took a beach walk to Edward’s house where the roof was blow off from hurricane Irma.  The chickens and peacocks were free of their cages and thus doing well to fend for themselves.  We’ve fed them some feed a few times, since we haven’t seen Edward down here yet.  We’ll be heading for Duncantown next for the next cold front.








© M&M 2016