Nova Scotia


And now for something completely different…. We are in the Canadian Maritimes on m/v Roam.  We took a five-day passage from Bermuda (green dot) almost due north to the southern coast of Nova Scotia.  



There was another Gulf Stream crossing on this leg, as the stream runs almost west to east around latitude 38˚N.



Our actual route was optimized for weather and eddies, of course.



The passage was fairly uneventful ~ just as you’d like it to be ~ with the exception of a few marlin hook-ups that got away!




Making landfall after a passage is always exciting.  




Lunenburg has views that were vibrant and unlike anything I’ve ever seen.   It has that New England feel, yet this formerly bustling fishing village has a waterfront expanse of deep colors and historical skyline that make it entirely unique.  You can’t stop taking photos of it in all conditions!












It is a lovely walking town with old homes, buildings, churches and cemeteries that are infinitely picturesque.  





















Even though Nova Scotia is a peninsula it certainly has an island feel.  Life slows down, people are friendly and local craftspeople make everything by hand… from gardens to boats to rum.






We are enjoying the local draft beer, seafood and classic boat fix!  


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We learned on a tour of the fishing museum that this was ground zero of the depletion of the cod fishery.  Touring the old saltbank boats gave a insight into the start of the fishery, where cod were caught on hand-lines from dorys, wet-stored in salt and brought back to dry on flakes that covered the hillside.  








The classic yellow dories are still in recreational use in the harbor.












In the old photos of this era, the images that were ingrained into my brain was ICE and more ICE. 


 


On the next-generation bottom trawlers, we met museum volunteers who had served on these boats since the age of 14 years old.  There used to be a huge fleet of cod fishers that worked 24/7/365.  Today there are still a few scallop boats active out of the bay, but the main industry in town has transitioned to tourism.  





The prevailing weather is now quite cold and we love it when the sun comes out and warms things up.  Other days are "New England" gray with frequent fog.  This makes us nostalgic for our Fisher’s Island Sound days on Echo where we’d occasionally see a seal or two.  Traveling along the Nova Scotia shoreline so far this week we saw harbor and gray seals and were lucky to get a puffin sighting!  









© M&M 2016